Marijuana is Not Always “All Natural”

Marijuana is Not Always “All Natural”

Many supporters of marijuana contend the plant is naturally occurring in nature, therefore it is safe to use. While there is truth to that assumption compared to synthetic drugs, the problem lies in the human interaction with the plant while it is being grown. Currently there are no laws or guidelines for residual pesticides levels in medicinal cannabis. Pesticides used in medicinal growing operations can often be found in medicinal cannabis that is already for sale to the patient. This residue found in the medicine can include neurotoxins which effect the nervous system and can cause brain disorders. These pesticides and other harmful contaminants are a major concern for patient safety. The greatest danger occurs with continued use of medicine that has chronic exposure of pesticide residue on it. Toxic at high levels and harmful at lower doses.

Sure you could find marijuana growing wild in many places, although those wild plants are not the source of what is bought and sold for recreational and medical uses.  The truth is, marketed marijuana is grown and managed by people.  Those people strive to produce the best quality plants in order to make more money.  Unfortunately, pesticides are often used to protect the plants from being eaten by a variety of bugs, and unlike the fruit and vegetable you eat, you do not wash your weed before smoking it.

Because your lungs do not filter the chemicals out, they enter your blood stream along with the THC.  For those users who inhale marijuana for medical purposes, the addition of pesticides into their blood cannot be beneficial in treating their ailments.  A recent study showed over 1/3 of tested marijuana was positive for the presence of pesticides.

In light of this discovery, each marijuana user should consider the facts and debate how “natural” the pot their smoking really is.

Read article here: http://www.times-standard.com/breakingnews/ci_24628828/what-are-you-smoking-study-finds-pesticides-transfer